Boymeat (boymeat) wrote,
Boymeat
boymeat

  • Mood:

A business/human relations thought.

Just to share with you an example of the random thoughts that pop into my head throughout the day.

There are a group of women who work somewhere in my office building who I see several times a week leaving the office at around 3 PM. They are holding in their hands bags of Jehovah's Witness materials - copies of Awake and Watchtower, along with any other little publications that might be out then. As I never see them with such materials in their hands in the morning or the evening, I have to assume that several times a week they take time from their work day to go hand out Jehovah's Witness materials and proselytize their good word. After all, it is a Jehovah's Witness' duty to spread their gospel.

Now, for those with any human resource background, or just in the mood to discuss - does a company have to allow for this under workforce laws protecting one's ability to practice their religion? I know that orthodox Jews must be allowed to leave before sundown on Friday's so they can observe the Sabbath. So clearly there is precedent to allow the above to occur.

On the other hand, the orthodox Jew mentioned above is probably going to religious services, and is also required by Jewish law not to work after sundown during the Sabbath. The Jehovah's Witnesses above are not leaving work to go pray, but instead to preach their religion and hopefully gain the interest of possible converts. So this isn't quite the same... or is it? After all, they are required to do such activities by their religion.

So as a human resource director, or a president/owner of a company, how would you react to a request to leave work for several hours one day, or even several days, a week to proselytize?
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 37 comments